scold


scold
01. The little boy began to cry after being [scolded] by his mother.
02. I didn't do my homework, so my teacher [scolded] me.
03. The teacher [scolded] the children for running in the halls.
04. The governor [scolded] the press for its criticism of the new legislation.
05. The little girl [scolded] her doll for not drinking her tea at the tea party for all her toys.
06. We never spank our children. We hardly even [scold] them unless it is absolutely necessary.
07. "You should have a coat on in this weather," the old woman [scolded] her husband.
08. The coach [scolded] the players for their lack of effort during the practice.
09. The mother bunny [scolded] the baby bunny for stealing the kind farmer's carrots.
10. Female whales will sometimes verbally [scold] their young, or even spank them with their tails when they misbehave.
11. The old woman next door [scolds] her husband as if he were a small child whenever he makes a mistake.
12. He began to [scold] his son for getting his clothes all dirty when he noticed the boy was crying and had a bleeding nose.
13. Pearl Buck once said that some are kissing mothers, and some are [scolding] mothers, but it is love just the same.
14. An old proverb notes that three things drive a man outdoors; smoke, a leaking roof and a [scolding] wife.

Grammatical examples in English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • scold — n shrew, vixen, termagant, *virago, amazon scold vb Scold, upbraid, rate, berate, tongue lash, jaw, bawl, chew out, wig, rail, revile, vituperate can all mean to reprove, reproach, or censure angrily, harshly, and more or less abusively. Scold,… …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • scold´er — scold «skohld», verb, noun. –v.t. to find fault with; blame with angry words: »His brother scolded him for breaking the baseball bat. –v.i. 1. to find fault; talk angrily: »Don t scold so much. 2. Obsolete. to quarrel noisily; brawl. ╂[< noun] …   Useful english dictionary

  • Scold — Scold, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Scolded}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Scolding}.] [Akin to D. schelden, G. schelten, OHG. sceltan, Dan. skielde.] To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scold — Scold, n. 1. One who scolds, or makes a practice of scolding; esp., a rude, clamorous woman; a shrew. [1913 Webster] She is an irksome, brawling scold. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. A scolding; a brawl. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skəuld US skould] v [T] [Date: 1200 1300; Origin: Probably from a Scandinavian language] to angrily criticize someone, especially a child, about something they have done = ↑tell off ▪ Do not scold the puppy, but simply and firmly say no. scold… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • scold — scold·er; scold·ing·ly; scold; …   English syllables

  • Scold — Scold, v. t. To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scold — [skōld] n. [ME scolde < ON skald, poet (prob. of satirical verses)] a person, esp. a woman, who habitually uses abusive language vt. [ME scolden < the n.] to find fault with angrily; rebuke or chide severely vi. 1. to find fault angrily 2.… …   English World dictionary

  • scold — index castigate, denounce (condemn), disapprove (condemn), fault, inveigh, rebuke, remonstrate …   Law dictionary

  • scold — (n.) mid 12c., person of ribald speech, also person fond of abusive language, from O.N. skald poet (see SKALD (Cf. skald)). The sense evolution may reflect the fact that Germanic poets (like their Celtic counterparts) were famously feared for… …   Etymology dictionary

  • scold — [v] find fault with abuse, admonish, asperse, berate, blame, castigate, cavil, censure, chasten, chide, criticize, denounce, disparage, dress down*, expostulate, give a talking to*, jump on*, keep aft*, lay down the law*, lecture, light into*,… …   New thesaurus